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art class today

art class today

from the Architectural and Cultural Guide Pyongyang.

from top to bottom:

  • government buildings on Kim Il Sung Square
  • Yongwang subway station
  • Pyongyang ice rink, built in 1981
  • The Arch of Reunification (shows two women holding a map of an undivided North Korea)
  • 500-foot-tall Pyongyang Koryo Hotel
  • The Party Foundation Monument (consists of a hammer, a sickle and a writing brush to represent workers, farmers and intellectuals)
  • Mangyongdae Schoolchildren’s Palace, a six-story building built in 1989.
  • Grand People’s Study House,  Pyongyang’s main library
  • residential block of Pyongyang

30 Books Everyone Should Read Before Turning 30 (Flavorwire version)

  1. The Illiad and The Odyssey, Homer
    Two of the oldest existing works of Western literature, these stories have in some way informed almost every quest and adventure tale written in the last thirteen centuries or so. Plus they’re frankly rollicking good tales. Especially if you read them in Greek.
  2. The Secret History, Donna Tartt
    Tartt’s obscenely beloved first novel — pagan rituals, elusive love affairs, youths murderous and studious in equal measure — should be read freshman year of college, during the winter. Trust us.
  3. Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson
    A ferocious collection of short stories told from the perspective of a strange young addict in a small Iowa town. It will knock you down, no matter how old you are.
  4. The Complete Stories, Flannery O’Connor
    The master of Southern gothic’s sharply spun tales whirr with comedy, grotesquerie, and insight.
  5. Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare
    We expect that by the time you’re 30 you’ll have read several Shakespeare plays — we recommend one per year at least, starting at age 12 — but this one is our favorite.
  6. The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway
    Think of him what you will, but everyone should read at least one Hemingway novel. In our experience, this one gets better the more you think about it, so we recommend reading it as early as possible.
  7. The Road, Cormac McCarthy
    The modern classic of post-apocalyptic novels, it’s also one of the best in a genre that’s only going to keep on exploding.
  8. Maus, Art Spiegelman
    A more perfect and affecting Holocaust book has never been written. And this one has pictures.
  9. Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card
    One of the best science fiction novels of all time, recommended even for staunch realists. Serious, complicated and impossible to put down. Plus, Card’s masterpiece trusts in the power of children, something we all need to be reminded of once in a while.
  10. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    Yes, even for guys.
  11. Middlesex, Jeffrey Eugenides
    Eugenides’s family epic of love, belonging and otherness is a must read for anyone who has ever had a family or felt like an outcast. So that’s pretty much everyone, we’d wager.
  12. Ghost World, Daniel Clowes
    Clowes writes some of the most essentially realistic teenagers we’ve ever come across, which is important when you are (or have ever been) a realistic teenager yourself.
  13. On the Road, Jack Kerouac
    Kerouac’s famous scroll must be read when it’s still likely to inspire exploration. Plus, then you’ll have ample time to develop your scorn towards it.
  14. Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston
    A seminal work in both African American and women’s literature — not to mention a riveting, electrifying and deeply moving read.
  15. Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut
    Vonnegut’s hilarious, satirical fourth novel that earned him a Master’s in anthropology from the University of Chicago.
  16. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
    One of the most beautifully written books in the English language, Nabokov will teach you a host of new words, not to mention new ways to think.
  17. The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
    The best large-scale fantasy epic out there, period. Required reading even for those who typically don’t go in for broadswords and beasts.
  18. 1984, George Orwell
    After all, Big Brother is watching you.
  19. The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger
    We vastly prefer Franny and Zooey, but we still think everyone should read Catcher as a teen. We know he’s obnoxious, but push on — you’ll miss a lot of cultural references if you don’t. And hey, you might be one of those people who’ll love Holden for life.
  20. The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
    The Great American Novel is still beautiful, heartbreaking and incredibly relevant in the 21st century.
  21. Beloved, Toni Morrison
    Possibly the best book in the Western canon — horrifying, deeply strange, and epically wonderful.
  22. Infinite Jest, David Foster Wallace
    Yes. Read it now. Once you read it, you’ll have to read it again at least twice, and you know it’s more than a thousand pages, so you’d better get started.
  23. Lord of the Flies, William Golding
    You need to know what your classmates are capable of when their childish veneer begins to wear.
  24. Don Quixote, Miguel De Cervantes
    One of the earliest canonical novels, it remains one of the greatest.
  25. The Trial, Franz Kafka
    Better to read a lot of Kafka before your life becomes too Kafkaesque. It’s always good to be prepared.
  26. To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
    An artful and introspective study of time and family, this book is one of the pillars of modernism and a gorgeous read besides.
  27. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
    Bradbury’s classic dystopian future is one where books are not allowed. Not only will it captivate you, it will make you want to read everything in sight — while you can.
  28. Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison
    Called “the quintessential American picaresque of the 20th century,” Ellison’s bildungsroman spreads beyond race and class to a mediation on humanity itself.
  29. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    Complex and satisfying, read this book to settle into Scout’s curious worldview and experience Atticus Finch, one of the greatest literary characters of all time.
  30. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
    To infuse all of your future adventures with a little extra literary joy.
Man Ray, Dora Maar, 1936.

Man Ray, Dora Maar, 1936.

“‘I hate darkness and sleep and night,’ said Jinny, ‘and lie longing for the day to come. I long that the week should be all one day without divisions. When I wake early—and the birds wake me—I lie and watch the brass handles on the cupboard grow clear; then the basin; then the towel-horse. As each thing in the bedroom grows clear, my heart beats quicker. I feel my body harden, and become pink, yellow, brown. My hands pass over my legs and body. I feel its slopes, its thinness. I love to hear the gong roar through the house and the stir begin—here a thud, there a patter. Doors slam; water rushes. Here is another day, here is another day, I cry, as my feet touch the floor. It may be a bruised day, an imperfect day. I am often scolded. I am often in disgrace for idleness, for laughing; but even as Miss Matthews grumbles at my feather-headed carelessness, I catch sight of something moving—a speck of sun perhaps on a picture, or the donkey drawing the mowing-machine across the lawn; or a sail that passes between the laurel leaves, so that I am never cast down. I cannot be prevented from pirouetting behind Miss Matthews into prayers.”

— Virginia Woolf, The Waves

  1. the Red Square in Moscow, Russia
  2. Mesa, Seen from Çufut Qale, near Bakhchisaray, Crimea, Ukraine

taken by K.W. in may 1991

Miles Davis, The Pan Piper

Artist: Miles Davis & Gil Evans
Album: Sketches Of Spain
Track: The Pan Piper
Tabriz Persian Rug, Semi-Antique.

Tabriz Persian Rug, Semi-Antique.

good evening sunshines

good evening sunshines


"Ideology, fighting spirit, way of life. In accordance with Military First (Policy), The same as our ancestors!"

photo by Philip Meuser in Architectural and Cultural Guide Pyongyang

"Ideology, fighting spirit, way of life. In accordance with Military First (Policy), The same as our ancestors!"

photo by Philip Meuser in Architectural and Cultural Guide Pyongyang

Satyricon (1969), Federico Fellini.

Satyricon (1969), Federico Fellini.

The Sound of Music Cast

The Sound of Music Cast

"The Snow Angel" by Mike Patton

Artist: Mike Patton
Album: The Place Beyond the Pines (Music from the Motion Picture)
Track: The Snow Angel
Le ballon rouge

Le ballon rouge

Untitled, 2008oil paint, slice of bread (a bite consumed by the artist)

Untitled, 2008
oil paint, slice of bread (a bite consumed by the artist)

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