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Emotion contenue, 1995 by Marie-Ange Guilleminot

Emotion contenue, 1995 by Marie-Ange Guilleminot

Jonathan Schipper, Slow Motion Car Crash (2012), Duration: 1 month
This slow motion car crash sculpture is actually moving at a speed of 7mm per hour in a choreographed collision.With a dramatic inevitability that reflects our own mortality, over the course of the month, the car is eventually destroyed.

Jonathan Schipper, Slow Motion Car Crash (2012), Duration: 1 month

This slow motion car crash sculpture is actually moving at a speed of 7mm per hour in a choreographed collision.

With a dramatic inevitability that reflects our own mortality, over the course of the month, the car is eventually destroyed.

'the Clockwork Forest' by Greyworld, 2011

The forest is often the mysterious location of secret stories, of distant sounds from hidden camp fires, of secret meetings and unexplained sounds. In The Clockwork Forest, we have created the first chapter of an untold fairy tale. Just turn the key and the mechanical soundtrack will accompany your journey in to the forest. Commissioned by the National Forestry Commission, this installation opened on the 7th October, 2011 in Grizedale, England.

listen to the soundtrack:

'the Clockwork Forest' by Greyworld, 2011

The forest is often the mysterious location of secret stories, of distant sounds from hidden camp fires, of secret meetings and unexplained sounds. In The Clockwork Forest, we have created the first chapter of an untold fairy tale. Just turn the key and the mechanical soundtrack will accompany your journey in to the forest. Commissioned by the National Forestry Commission, this installation opened on the 7th October, 2011 in Grizedale, England.

listen to the soundtrack:

Antony Gormley, Another Place, 2005 (Crosby Beach, Liverpool)

Antony Gormley, Another Place, 2005 (Crosby Beach, Liverpool)

Guia RigvavaThis World is Leaving, 1995video installationThe threshold between appearance and reality is Guia Rigvava’s overriding preoccupation. His early works from the early nineties while in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, aimed at the destruction of our instinctive reliance on our visual perception of the world. Thus, the seemingly precise photographic copies joined to the surfaces of objects nevertheless contained some imperceptible distortions of reality. Later, after moving to Moscow, the artist adopted the style of multimedia performances, using television and broadcasting technology (“You are helpless, or, all in all, it does not seem so bad”, 1993). In this project the artist exposed the mechanism by which media creates fiction. 

Guia Rigvava
This World is Leaving, 1995

video installation

The threshold between appearance and reality is Guia Rigvava’s overriding preoccupation. His early works from the early nineties while in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, aimed at the destruction of our instinctive reliance on our visual perception of the world. Thus, the seemingly precise photographic copies joined to the surfaces of objects nevertheless contained some imperceptible distortions of reality. Later, after moving to Moscow, the artist adopted the style of multimedia performances, using television and broadcasting technology (“You are helpless, or, all in all, it does not seem so bad”, 1993). In this project the artist exposed the mechanism by which media creates fiction. 


secondhandhuman: I remember seeing this work (Venus of Rags) in person at the Tate Modern when I was studying in London in 2010, but it really didn’t strike me at the time. Pushed up against a bare, white wall and paired with other contemporary Arte Povera works, it just looked dated, old-fashioned.
When we looked at this installation image in my 20th century European art class, however, it struck me differently. Recontextualized in a grand space infused with historical and cultural memory, it takes on an entirely different meaning than when it’s shown in the conventional white cube (see Tate installation here). At the Tate, it felt like an image of itself, simply an ironic, unspeaking example of an outmoded art movement. Here, it’s powerfully affective.

secondhandhumanI remember seeing this work (Venus of Rags) in person at the Tate Modern when I was studying in London in 2010, but it really didn’t strike me at the time. Pushed up against a bare, white wall and paired with other contemporary Arte Povera works, it just looked dated, old-fashioned.

When we looked at this installation image in my 20th century European art class, however, it struck me differently. Recontextualized in a grand space infused with historical and cultural memory, it takes on an entirely different meaning than when it’s shown in the conventional white cube (see Tate installation here). At the Tate, it felt like an image of itself, simply an ironic, unspeaking example of an outmoded art movement. Here, it’s powerfully affective.

Dream of Venus, Salvador Dali

Dream of Venus, Salvador Dali

Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, 2011 installation views by Axel Schneider

Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, 2011 
installation views by Axel Schneider

Upside-Down Mushroom Room (2000) by Carsten Höller

Upside-Down Mushroom Room (2000) by Carsten Höller

Untitled (2011) by Batia Suterwall with 49 posters (laserprint on paper)  Installation at Espai Cultural Obra Social Caja Madrid, Barcelona ES

Untitled (2011) by Batia Suter
wall with 49 posters (laserprint on paper)  
Installation at Espai Cultural Obra Social Caja Madrid, Barcelona ES

Kara Walker installing “Gone…” in 1994

Kara Walker installing “Gone…” in 1994

"The Maybe" at the Serpentine Gallery, London (1995) byCornelia Parker

In this installation, Tilda Swinton played the toughest role in a career devoted to challenging ones: herself asleep or apparently so. For seven consecutive days, eight hours a day, she lay motionless, eyes closed, in a raised, glass casket – a contemporary Sleeping Beauty in jeans and deck shoes, subject to intense scrutiny and speculation.

"The Maybe" at the Serpentine Gallery, London (1995) byCornelia Parker

In this installation, Tilda Swinton played the toughest role in a career devoted to challenging ones: herself asleep or apparently so. For seven consecutive days, eight hours a day, she lay motionless, eyes closed, in a raised, glass casket – a contemporary Sleeping Beauty in jeans and deck shoes, subject to intense scrutiny and speculation.

"Vestige" by Rob Mulholland 

"The essence of who we are as individuals in relationship to others and our given environment forms a strong aspect of my artistic practice. 
In Vestige I wanted to explore this relationship further by creating a group, a community within the protective elements of the woods, reflecting  the past inhabitants of the space. 
Before the First World War this area of Scotland was open hillside with small sheep farming Crofts and rural communities. The crofters were moved to other land by the government as there was a desperate need for timber, the area was planted with fast growing trees suitable for harvesting and the landscape altered once again. 
You can still see the some faint outlines of the crofts and past settlements within the woods, this intrigued me and I wanted to find a visual form that would represent the past inhabitants of the land.
The human desire to leave a trace of oneself, to project our views and culture for future generations. It’s a driving force to create and leave a semblance of which we are as individuals. 
The six male and female figures not only absorb their environment, they create a notion of non - space, a link with the past that forces us both as individuals and as a society to consider our relationship with our natural environment.”

"Vestige" by Rob Mulholland 

"The essence of who we are as individuals in relationship to others and our given environment forms a strong aspect of my artistic practice. 

In Vestige I wanted to explore this relationship further by creating a group, a community within the protective elements of the woods, reflecting  the past inhabitants of the space. 

Before the First World War this area of Scotland was open hillside with small sheep farming Crofts and rural communities. The crofters were moved to other land by the government as there was a desperate need for timber, the area was planted with fast growing trees suitable for harvesting and the landscape altered once again. 

You can still see the some faint outlines of the crofts and past settlements within the woods, this intrigued me and I wanted to find a visual form that would represent the past inhabitants of the land.

The human desire to leave a trace of oneself, to project our views and culture for future generations. It’s a driving force to create and leave a semblance of which we are as individuals. 

The six male and female figures not only absorb their environment, they create a notion of non - space, a link with the past that forces us both as individuals and as a society to consider our relationship with our natural environment.”

At Any Given Moment, Fall 2
Rebecca Mendez

At Any Given Moment, Fall 2

Rebecca Mendez

Singularity (2006) by Kika Thorne

Singularity (2006) by Kika Thorne

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